Tagged: Science

BLOG: The Pass-Through Rates of Excise Taxes to Alcoholic Beverage Prices: New Evidence from OECD Countries

Among all policies aimed at reducing heavy alcohol use and related harms, increasing taxes is the most effective intervention. Therefore, it matters greatly how much alcohol prices increase in response to per unit tax increase – the so-called tax pass through rate. Nevertheless, evidence is still scarce.
In this blog post, Ce Shang introduces groundbreaking research with colleagues Anh Ngo and Frank J. Chaloupka. They have examined the pass-through rates of various alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine, and liquors in 27 OECD countries from 2003 to 2016. By analzying the tax pass-through rates on alcoholic beverages comprehensively, this new research provides insights for more informed, efficacious, and effective alcohol taxation policies to reduce alcohol harm and promote healthy behaviors.
Ce Shang and colleagues evaluate how taxes are passed differently to various price levels along the price distribution (i.e., higher- vs. lower priced products), showing that for most alcoholic beverages, the tax pass-through rates are higher for higher-priced products. Overall, manufacturers of beer and wine may adjust down the prices of lower-priced products in response to past tax hikes to keep these products affordable. The alcohol industry in responding strategically to taxes in order to keep cheap alcohol as cheap as possible. Thus, despite tax increases, prices of cheap products may still be low…

REPORT: Relationships Between Area Income, Off‐Premise Alcohol Outlet Density, Alcohol Use Patterns and Problems

Distinguishing the impacts of neighborhood income and off‐premise alcohol outlet density on alcohol use has proven difficult, particularly given the conflation of these measures across neighborhood areas.
Living in a high‐income site, regardless of off‐premise alcohol outlet density, was associated with more frequent alcohol use and higher alcohol dependence/problems.
Both individual‐level income and site‐level income were related to greater frequencies of use, but lower income alcohol users in high‐income areas consumed more alcohol than comparable alcohol users in low‐income areas.
Study participants living in high‐density off‐premise alcohol outlet sites consumed alcohol less frequently but did not differ in terms of either AUDIT scores or heavy alcohol use from participants living in low‐density sites…

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NEWS: Worldwide Alcohol Policy Newsletter Week 25

Carefully curated highlights from Alcohol Policy News, Latest Science Digest, and Big Alcohol Watch.
This week, Alcohol Policy News come from Estonia, the United States, France, and India…
The Latest Science Digest covers issues of the alcohol policy and the coronavirus as well as the rise and fall of alcohol taxation in the United States…
The Big Alcohol Watch exposes a new lobby front for Big Alcohol in Sweden, and what they are planning and the industry’s ruthlessness in the on-demand alcohol delivery business…
This week’s Special Feature sheds more light on the potential of alcohol taxation to reach health and development for all and on the political realities of how the potential is often ignored and squandered…

NEWS: USA: Alcohol Taxes At Historic Low As Alcohol Harm Rises

Inflation has reduced American alcohol tax rates by 70% since 1933, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. The trend is compounded by the decision of the Trump administration to cut taxes further for major alcohol producers in the United States…

REPORT: Alcohol Policy and Coronavirus: An Open Research Agenda

There are many implications from the COVID-19 counter-measures for research on alcohol consumption, harms, and policies – in high- and low-income countries – related to rapid changes in the supply, demand, marketing, alcohol consumption contexts, associated risks, and other environmental factors known to influence alcohol-related outcomes…

REPORT: Consuming Alcohol Alone: COVID-19, Lockdown, and Alcohol-Related Harm

Globally significant health issues that existed before COVID-19 have not gone away: in many instances, the pandemic may have exacerbated the problem.
Alcohol-related harm is one such case.
While these preliminary data must be treated with caution, they hint at the emergence of a subgroup of alcohol users at risk of establishing potentially dangerous patterns of alcohol consumption during lockdown.
The disruption of COVID-19 thus has a potential double effect: individuals are put under stresses that increase risk of relapse, while also experiencing disruption of the social networks that might otherwise help maintain sobriety. Preliminary signs suggest that increased alcohol use disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic is manifesting as alcohol-related liver disease.
Governments must incorporate warnings about the harms of heavy alcohol consumption into their public health messaging about COVID-19…

REPORT: The Rise and Fall of Alcohol Excise Taxes in U.S. States, 1933–2018

The value of alcohol excise taxes has declined since 1970 from both insufficient tax increases and later infrequent tax increases. Laws that index rates to inflation could sustain the public health benefit of reduced morbidity and mortality resulting from higher alcohol tax rates…