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Study: Alcohol Use Linked To Heart Disease

Alcohol Abuse Increases Risk Of Multiple Heart Conditions

Heart attack, atrial fibrillation, and congestive heart failure risk increases with alcohol abuse. The risk of these heart conditions has been found to climb up with excessive alcohol drinking as much as with other known risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and obesity.

A new study published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology has found that alcohol consumption could increase your risk of atrial fibrillation, heart attack, and congestive heart failure just as much as other risk factors, such as smoking.

The University of California, San Francisco, research team analyzed information from a database of all California residents ages 21 and older. Between 2005 and 2009, all 14.7 million of these participants received ambulatory surgery, emergency, or inpatient medical care in California. Of these participants, 1.8% — or approximately 268,000 — had been diagnosed with alcohol abuse. Researchers discovered that the increased heart health risks were just as detrimental as more established risk factors such as diabetes, high blood

Alcohol a major risk factor

Of these participants, 1.8% — or approximately 268,000 — had been diagnosed with alcohol abuse. Researchers discovered that the increased heart health risks were just as detrimental as more established risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. Eliminating alcohol abuse would result in about 73,000 fewer atrial fibrillation cases, 34,000 fewer heart attacks, and 91,000 fewer congestive heart failure patients in the United States, the team estimated, according to the release.

We found that even if you have no underlying risk factors, abuse of alcohol still increases the risk of these heart conditions,” explained lead researcher of the study Gregory M. Marcus, according to news reporting.

Key findings show that eliminating alcohol abuse would result in

  • About 73,000 fewer atrial fibrillation cases,
  • 34,000 fewer heart attacks, and
  • 91,000 fewer congestive heart failure patients in the United States.

Heart disease still remains to be the number cause of death among men and women despite advances in prevention and treatment.

Source Website: Journal of the American College of Cardiology