Author

Kypros Kypri (E-mail: kypros.kypri@newcastle.edu.au), Jim McCambridge, Narelle Robertson, Florentine Martino, Mike Daube, Peter Adams, Peter Miller

Citation

Kypri, K., McCambridge, J., Robertson, N., Martino, F., Daube, M., Adams, P. and Miller, P. (2019), ‘If someone donates $1000, they support you. If they donate $100 000, they have bought you’. Mixed methods study of tobacco, alcohol and gambling industry donations to Australian political parties. Drug Alcohol Rev., 38: 226-233. doi:10.1111/dar.12878


Source
Drug and Alcohol Review
Release date
25/11/2018

‘If someone donates $1000, they support you. If they donate $100 000, they have bought you’. Mixed methods study of tobacco, alcohol and gambling industry donations to Australian political parties

Original Paper

Abstract

Background and Aims

Business corporations’ use of political donations to garner political influence is especially troubling in relation to products that damage human health. The researchers sought to investigate patterns of donations to Australian political parties from tobacco, alcohol and gambling industry actors and the experiences of key informants.

Design and Methods

The researchers analysed public data on federal and state donations for 10 years to June 2015. The researchers conducted 28 semi‐structured interviews with current and former politicians, ex‐political staffers and other key informants, concerning the role played by political donations of tobacco, alcohol and gambling companies in Australian politics. The researchers examined temporal associations in donations data, and thematically analysed interviews.

Results

Australian political parties declared donations of A$14 million (US$11 M) from tobacco ($1.9 M), alcohol ($7.7 M), gambling ($2.9 M) and supermarket ($1.7 M) entities, excluding donations below the $12 800 reporting threshold.

Donations to the governing party increased substantially during debates about an alcohol tax and gambling law reform. Alcohol industry donations to major parties spiked ahead of elections.

Interviewees identified the function of donations in terms of:

  1. buying immediate influence;
  2. building long‐term relationships;
  3. exploiting a flawed political system; and
  4. the need to look beyond donations, for example, to favour exchange; and the public’s right to know about corporate influence on policy‐makers.

Discussion and Conclusions

The alcohol and gambling industries make substantial donations to influence particular decisions in the short term and build relationships over the long term. Banning corporate donations and publicly funding political parties warrant consideration to safeguard the integrity of public policy‐making.


Source Website: Wiley Online Library